• Most Denver residents can access Fiber or DSL from CenturyLink and cable from Xfinity.
  • Smaller local providers like ForeThought and WiFiHood bridge the gap in some areas. ForeThought fiber is only available in specific multi-unit buildings.
  • Google plans to offer gigabit fixed wireless service through WebPass in Denver in the near future.[1]

Best Residential Internet Providers in Denver

We combed through the fine print and promotional offers to decide which Internet plan offered the best value in Denver. Here’s our top pick and runner-up:

Residential Internet Providers Available in Denver

As a rule of thumb, fiber offers the best residential Internet, followed by cable and DSL. Fixed wireless is also a common option in the Denver area, and the technology has improved in recent years to make it a real competitor for wired service.

While DSL is usually less preferable than cable, it’s worth pointing out that in Denver specifically, CenturyLink’s DSL service comes without a data cap, while Xfinity caps at a terabyte/month.

Below is a table of every Internet option in Denver currently registered with the FCC.

ProvidersPricingAvailabilityPhone
$4500+ 89%
DSL
(888) 450-4052
$2999+ 95%
Cable
(855) 436-3540
$6990+ 81%
Fixed Wireless
(720) 851-1111
N/A 1%
DSL
(303) 458-5667
$2995+ 54%
Fixed Wireless
(877) 910-6204
$4499+ 3%
DSL
(855) 837-8791
$9900+ 77%
Fixed Wireless
(888) 683-4887
$4499+ 98%
Fixed Wireless
(877) 248-8828
$5999+ 100%
Satellite
(888) 387-7910
$5000+ 100%
Satellite
(877) 255-5702
$4500+ 3%
DSL
(303) 815-1000

Best Business Internet Providers

Business broadband requirements tend to be much higher than a standard residential plan can offer, from static IPs to symmetrical upload/download speeds.

Denver’s booming tech scene has increased availability and competition for business broadband in Denver. Here’s our top pick for best value on a business broadband plan:

Business Internet Providers Available in Denver

Depending on the neighborhood your offices are located in, options can vary pretty widely outside central Denver.

Sometimes providers will offer plans specific to a neighborhood or building, so be sure to check your address manually with a rep at any of these business broadband providers currently serving Denver.

ProvidersPricingAvailabilityPhone
$5499+ 96%
DSL
(888) 450-4052
$6995+ 90%
Cable
(855) 436-3540
$11995+ 90%
Fixed Wireless
(720) 851-1111
N/A 5%
Copper
(877) 757-5799
$6995+ 65%
Fixed Wireless
(877) 910-6204
N/A 18%
Fiber
(866) 963-4237
$5000+ 12%
DSL
(855) 837-8791
N/A 7%
Copper
(800) 421-3887
N/A 89%
Fixed Wireless
(888) 683-4887
$5499+ 99%
Fixed Wireless
(877) 248-8828
N/A 99%
Fixed Wireless
(877) 926-8646
$6999+ 100%
Satellite
(888) 387-7910
$9999+ 100%
Satellite
(877) 255-5702
N/A 3%
DSL
(703) 442-5500
N/A 11%
DSL
(866) 226-4244
N/A 11%
Copper
(866) 424-5544
N/A 4%
DSL
(303) 815-1000

Map of Broadband Internet Competition in Denver

Denver is decently wired when it comes to broadband, and most neighborhoods at least have the choice between DSL and cable. In more central areas, fiber options from CenturyLink and a few niche providers round out the picture.

Something that makes Denver unique is their large fixed wireless provider count, creating some livable deals for farther-flung neighborhoods that might not have access to the latest cutting-edge wired options.

Provider Competition Map

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Denver Internet Speed Overview

Comcast Xfinity recently stepped up their game in response to CenturyLink’s fiber expansion, and has been offering gigabit cable service throughout much of their local network in Denver. That said, gigabit cable comes at a high price compared to true fiber, and the upload speed is usually much lower than the “gigabit” download speed advertised.

Average Speed90th Percentile Speed
39.11 Mbps102.52 Mbps

Average Residential download speeds within Denver

Top Factors to Consider When Shopping for Internet Service in Denver

There are a couple important things to understand before choosing an Internet provider in Denver: how cable and DSL work, and how bundling affects your overall price.

Technology: Cable vs DSL in Denver

As explained above, the main options for home Internet in Denver are cable from Xfinity and DSL from CenturyLink. While CenturyLink offers fiber in some areas, it’s not yet a reality for the vast majority of Denver residents.

…But what’s the difference between cable and DSL Internet? The short version is: cable Internet comes from cable TV companies and is delivered over cable lines. DSL Internet comes from phone companies, and is delivered over phone lines.

Cable generally clocks in with faster speeds and more reliability, but loses points for slowing down during peak use times (usually 5–9pm). The cables are usually buried for at least part of their journey, making cable Internet less vulnerable to weather interruption.

DSL is more budget-friendly, but tends to be a bit slower and less reliable since it relies on above-ground copper telephone lines for delivery. However, it can actually outperform cable in some parts of Denver depending on the distance between your specific address and the local CenturyLink office.

It also creates a direct connection for your Internet rather than the “shared” connection common with cable, so it doesn’t slow down when your neighbors start streaming Netflix at the same time.

Denver-Area Double Play and Triple Play bundle deals

Another reason the difference between cable and DSL matters is because of bundling.

Most wired Internet providers in Denver offer TV and phone service in addition to Internet connections. Bundle those services together, and you’ll probably save some cash every month compared to purchasing services separately.

We found Xfinity to have some of the better TV channel packages, although CenturyLink partners with DirecTV to offer good value if you have space for a satellite dish.

Local Information

Fixed Wireless Options

The arrival of wireless gigabit service from WebPass[2], which was recently acquired by Google, has brought new attention to the possibility of a wireless revolution in Denver. As you can see in our list of Denver Internet providers above, wireless is a popular and prevalent option, even in areas where wired options like DSL are available. New advances in fixed wireless technology have given hope to neighborhoods that otherwise would be difficult to reach with wired service.

Denver City Government Broadband Initiatives

While Colorado state holds a few municipal broadband network success stories, Denver itself is currently completely privatized so far as Internet infrastructure. While the Denver area historically supports publicly-funded fiber infrastructure[3], in practice the community has mostly relied on promoting competition between private companies like Comcast and CenturyLink. The plethora of wireless options in Denver makes it possible for customers to choose another provider if they can’t afford price hikes, resulting in decent price-to-speed value compared to other parts of the state.

Broadband Roadblocks in Denver

The biggest issue currently facing Internet access in Denver is the lack of true fiber infrastructure in the last mile. Installing fiber is expensive, so it’s difficult for private companies to justify the expense unless forced to by competition from other providers.

Denver has been considered by Fiber providers like Google Fiber in the past, but the lack of access to dark fiber and patchwork nature of local infrastructure and regulation has stopped it from making the shortlist for citywide Fiber to the Home (FTTH) service from outside providers thus far.

Local Perspective

For more information on the future of Internet access in Denver, we’ve reached out to local government staff and tech organizations for commentary. If you are involved in a broadband initiative in Denver that isn’t featured on this page, please let us know so we can include your information.


Experts

Ana De Castro

Ana De Castro

Ana De Castro cut her teeth as a SAP consultant for Deloitte during the original tech boom, and now works in a communications role in the telecom industry. When she isn’t explaining technical concepts to confused consumers, she enjoys traveling with her husband and two rambunctious kids.

James Webb

James Webb

James Webb is a tech and gadgets expert with a focus on educational content development. He draws on his background in the startup world to make complicated technologies and topics easy to understand for normal folks.

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