• Most Las Vegas residents have two choices: Cox Communications or CenturyLink.
  • Cox provides Cable service while CenturyLink is DSL. Cable is generally more reliable, but comes at a slightly higher cost. DSL is usually the “budget” option, making it a good choice if finances are your top concern.
  • CenturyLink and Cox are both working to create and expand gigabit fiber networks in Las Vegas. These plans generally come with significantly higher monthly pricing and multi-year contracts.
  • Free basic Wi-Fi is available in downtown Las Vegas through a partnership between the city and business broadband provider LV.Net.

Best Residential Internet Providers

Cable from Cox tends to be the best option for the average Las Vegas household when it comes to top speed and reliability. It’s particularly affordable if you want to throw in TV service. Keep in mind that they generally cap data, so it’s probably worth getting a TV plan along with service if you watch a lot of video.

DSL from CenturyLink is a close runner up with great budget pricing for Internet-only plans. They don’t have a data cap, so they might be the better choice if your main use for Internet is streaming Netflix, Hulu, and other over-the-top video providers.

Residential Internet Providers Available in Las Vegas

In most las Vegas neighborhoods, picking Internet means choosing between coaxial cable and DSL service.

Cable Internet (mostly from Cox) is delivered via coaxial cable TV lines. While not as fast as fiber, it provides decent speeds well over 100 Mbps. Cable Internet is often bundled with cable TV service since it comes via the same companies and network, resulting in some good deals for Internet users who also want TV service.

The main problem with cable service in Las Vegas is that the connection is shared between houses in individual neighborhoods. As a result, speed and ping can slow down considerable during “peak use” times.

DSL (mostly from CenturyLink) comes via traditional phone networks. Because the copper cables used for phone service are installed above-ground and are less advanced than coaxial cables, DSL tends to be a bit less reliable.

Speed and latency with DSL in Las Vegas depends on your specific addresses distance from the local provider office. If you happen to be nearby, service might be better than cable. If you’re farther, it’ll probably be spotty.

ProvidersPricingAvailabilityPhone
$4500+ 93%
DSL
(888) 450-4052
$2999+ 96%
Cable
(855) 436-4273
$12500+ 0%
Fiber
(800) 340-4131
N/A 98%
Fixed Wireless
(702) 900-0000
$2995+ 48%
Fixed Wireless
(877) 910-6204
$4499+ 3%
DSL
(855) 837-8791
$5999+ 100%
Satellite
(888) 387-7910
$5000+ 100%
Satellite
(877) 255-5702

Best Business Internet Providers

Because fiber providers in Las Vegas are few and far between, it can be tricky to find the right service for your business. Options vary depending on area. Here’s our pick for best overall business broadband provider in Las Vegas.

Business Internet Providers Available in Las Vegas

Las Vegas has several business providers to choose from, depending on location and bandwidth requirements. Here’s a full list of business providers currently serving the area.

ProvidersPricingAvailabilityPhone
$5499+ 100%
DSL
(888) 450-4052
$8900+ 62%
Cable
(855) 436-4273
N/A 0%
Fiber
(800) 340-4131
N/A 100%
Fixed Wireless
(702) 900-0000
$6995+ 31%
Fixed Wireless
(877) 910-6204
$5000+ 15%
DSL
(855) 837-8791
N/A 9%
Copper
(800) 421-3887
$6999+ 100%
Satellite
(888) 387-7910
$9999+ 0%
Satellite
(877) 255-5702
N/A 5%
DSL
(703) 442-5500
N/A 9%
DSL
(866) 226-4244
N/A 22%
Copper
(888) 407-9594

Map of Broadband Internet Competition in Las Vegas

Competition between Internet providers in Las Vegas is average for the time being. It’s not a monopoly like you’ll find in some spread-out western cities, and most areas at least have the choice between cable and DSL.

Check the map below to see how your particular Las Vegas neighborhood stacks up for Internet options:

Provider Competition Map

Loading
COVERAGE CENSUS TRACTS

Las Vegas Internet Speed Overview

We’ve collected speed test data on the average speed as well as fastest available speeds in the city. We found the average residential speed in Las Vegas to be 38.1 Mbps, while the top speed available only in select areas is 102.95 Mbps.

Average Speed90th Percentile Speed
38.1 Mbps102.95 Mbps

Average Residential download speeds within Las Vegas

Top Factors to Consider When Shopping for Internet Service in Las Vegas

There are two common “gotchas” among Internet plans in Las Vegas: early termination fees and modem rental fees.

Early Termination Fees

Cox and CenturyLink both offer good deals for 1–2 year contract plans. Locking in the price is a good idea for long-term customers, but people often sign on without considering the fee they’ll have to pay if they need to move or switch before the contract is up. Our advice: just be sure to check the early termination fee (sometimes abbreviated as ETF in plan information) and make sure it’s worth the savings for your situation.

Modem Rental Fees

Another thing Cox and CenturyLink have in common in Las Vegas is modem rentals. Whatever Internet plan you choose, there’ll likely be a modem and router or combo “gateway” unit tacked onto the final price for an extra $5–10/month. Considering the outright cost of purchasing your hardware up-front is likely between $40–120, you can save hundreds in the long run by purchasing your own equipment. Really, renting only makes sense if you plan on using their service for a year or less.

CenturyLink gets plus points in this department for including tons of helpful information on their site about which brands are compatible with their service and how to set them up. (Full CenturyLink-compatible router list available here.) Information on Cox-compatible equipment is also available at the provider website.

Local Information

Las Vegas is the scrappy underdog of tech cities. The broadband infrastructure around downtown is similarly scrappy… but promising.

Millions of dollars — mostly private — have been spent on turning downtown Las Vegas into a tech paradise. Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh is among the biggest spenders, pouring over $350 Million into various revitalization projects in the downtown Las Vegas area.[1]

While it hasn’t fueled a tech growth spurt quite on par with Denver or Austin, the startup economy in Las Vegas is much bigger than ever before, and broadband access has improved in revitalized areas. The access to unique funding sources and scrappy, low-cost lifestyle makes it a unique place for bootstrapped startups and established tech companies alike.

While there aren’t any major fiber players widely available in the Las Vegas market yet, locals are counting on tech growth to encourage local providers and newcomers to create more options — particularly for gigabit and fiber service.

Broadband Roadblocks in Las Vegas

The biggest problem facing Internet users in Las Vegas is lack of competition. Without competition, companies have little incentive to innovate.

Local providers like CenturyLink have been advertising fiber service recently, but in practice the rollout of fiber networks is usually very slow unless prompted by competition from an outside competitor like Google Fiber.

Local Perspective

We’ve reached out to the Las Vegas government and local information technology groups to ask for their commentary on what residents can expect for the future of broadband in Las Vegas. Conversations are ongoing, and we will update this page when the information has been compiled. If you are involved with a group or initiative in the Las Vegas area working to improve broadband access, don’t hesitate to reach out and tell us about it so we can include that information on this page.


Experts

Ana De Castro

Ana De Castro

Ana De Castro cut her teeth as a SAP consultant for Deloitte during the original tech boom, and now works in a communications role in the telecom industry. When she isn’t explaining technical concepts to confused consumers, she enjoys traveling with her husband and two rambunctious kids.

James Webb

James Webb

James Webb is a tech and gadgets expert with a focus on educational content development. He draws on his background in the startup world to make complicated technologies and topics easy to understand for normal folks.

Ask a Question

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.